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because of the impasse and also the fact that the consequences of the fiscal cliff, these spending cuts and these tax -- pardon me the spending cuts and the tax increases that kick in here at the end of the year, the consequences are very dire and following the election the white house and democrats think that they can really push republicans into a corner here. >> brianna keilar for us. thank you. just ahead we're going to be talking with connecticut senator richard blumenthal will join us to talk a little bit about the democrats' responsibility about this impending fiscal cliff. another story we're following, friends and family of kansas city chiefs jovan belcher looking for answers this morning after he killed his girlfriend and then took his own life. his team took to the field just a day after the tragedy. it was i guess kind of a somber victory. they beat the carolina panthers 27-21. just their second game of the season. saturday morning belcher shot his 22-year-old girlfriend kasandra perkins and then turned the gun on himself outside the practice facility. he and perkins leave b
over that so-called fiscal cliff. tax hikes and spending cuts kick in if no agreement is reached between the house and republicans on how to close the budget gap. it has been more than two weeks since president obama invited the major players to the white house to discuss the situation. as of this morning, no new talks are scheduled. brianna keilar joins us. so many republicans say they are pessimistic about a deal happening in time to avert this fiscal cliff. some say it's for political reasons. what can you tell us? >> it may all be for political reasons. that's no surprise in washington. as you can seen through dealmaking not just on this but things in the past couple of years between the white house and congress, there is almost this rhythm that has evolved. both sides are pointing to the other for an impasse. republicans like senator lindeyy graham just slamming the white house and tim geithner for a plan he laid out on behalf of the administration, laying out about $1.6 trillion in new revenues coupled with only about $400 billion in medicare cuts. listen to what graham sai
doors and figure how they get past january and how they avoid this fiscal cliff, not only the spending cuts and tax increases but spending cuts particularly in defense. they don't want that. >> explain why what they agree on -- namely that the middle class, 98% of all taxpayers, that their taxes will stay the same, they will not go up. if everyone agrees at least on that, the president says, go ahead and pass that. why not just eliminate the 98% who won't have any changes, those making under $250,000? why not allow that to go forward? why are the republicans resisting on that. >> it could wind up there, wolf. but if the republicans lose that, they believe they kind of lose the leverage that they have. if they sort of give on that, then where's their leverage with the white house? so i think that in the end, wolf, if i had to bet -- and i don't like to bet on these things because they always disappoint -- but i would have to say that the one thing they are all likely to do at some point is to make sure the taxes do not go up on the middle class. but in order to do that, republicans want
. >>> call it the fiscal cliff follies, because with 28 days remaining before massive tax hikes and spending cuts kick in, democrats and republicans are ridiculing each other's ideas. it's a recipe for recession. the gop offering up its first plan which calls for $2.2 trillion in deficit savings over the next decade, including $800 billion in tax reforms, 600 million in medicare reforms and spending cuts. but the president rejected it outright because it does not contain tax hikes for the rich. time is running out. any sign of serious negotiation on the horizon? >> i'd say on the horizon, that would be fair. the log jam that you're watching, we're expecting to continued likely until next week. so don't be surprised if you see that. i think the policy prescriptions here, what needs to be done to find a package for deficit reduction are clear. right now you're watching the politics play out. all you need do is open your ears, listen to the white house, listen to congressional republicans you'll hear them playing the blame game. >> making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping d
the fiscal cliff. that's called into question the anti-tax pledge republicans have signed. iffer some lawmaker that is means no agreement. >> it is not the norquist pledge but the americans no tax reform pledge and the one thing really keeping republicans -- i don't know what republicans stand for. it looks like for this in washington, it's a host of things. at least the democrats are responsible enough to get loans from china. the republicans want to do it without paying for it without any fiscal discipline. at one point the republicans have to do it -- the pledge was the last they based it on. >> nothing was done, though. that's a bad thing, aaron. >> why? i'm not sure that it is. i'm not sure that this fiscal cliff really is a fiscal cliff. i think that it changes the baseline. republicans get better negotiating position on the other side when they are not scared to death of their own shadow and fearful of not looking reasonable. to think that the same joker who is got us this compromise will somehow get us a better compromise is absolutely silly. some of these guys have been voted
cliff. we now know that we're 29 days away before the massive spending cuts and tax increases go into effect automatically the beginning of the year. the white house presented their plan and now just today we're getting news on the side of the republicans. ali velshi, chief business correspondent, let me bring you in. the first major difference, let's be crystal clear and run through this proposition, the fact that they want to extend the bush era tax cuts for everybody. >> right. something that some 67% of americans said that they don't agree with, something the white house says is a nonstarter. however, they have put a proposal forward. i suppose if you're negotiating, you don't put first proposal forward, the one you're going to end up with. this is from house speaker john boehner in a 2 1/2 page letter to the president, it proposes $2.2 trillion in cuts. and let me show you how they get there. $800 billion in tax reform. that is closing loopholes and credits. $600 billion in health care and medicare changes. $300 billion in other mandatory savings. $300 billion in discretiona
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6